Wonderland.

PFW: GUY LAROCHE

A shifted tone at Guy Laroche for SS16 meant protruding leatherwear and updated trenches.

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Ready for Anything

The Guy Laroche show is a Paris schedule stalwart. A label that opened under Monsieur Laroche in the late fifties, its aim was to liberate women from the oppressive silhouette of Christian Dior’s infamous ‘new look’. Its current creative director – Adam Andrascik – certainly kept this in mind for SS16, with separates, shirt dresses and dress-coats (the latter two actually invented by the house in its infancy) designed for all wardrobes, on any occasion.

Changing Directions

The collection itself saw a shift in tone for the label, who are usually more focused on the simple – with the odd addition to silhouette here and there. This season saw a much more geometric look at cuts – with asymmetric over panels on skirts, and dresses which had hanging fabric corners at the hem. The classic trench coat had peepholes removed, exposing glimpses of gold embellishment on the under layer. ‘Feature prints’ were a through theme – showcasing army-camo, beaches and palm trees in panels across the looks. Leatherwear came in racing car blue and black – with huge link-chains hanging at the side, or the breast. The bags were a highlight – in unusual diagonals, or with swirling pieces of leather which looked like an extension of the arm.

Lacking Clarity

Overall, however, the offering felt a little confused. It seemed as though the designer was going for a re-imagining of Helmut Newton’s amazonian muse in terms of look (already a problematic trope), however the product felt mismatched – think Destiny’s Child “Survivor”. Iconic then, outdated now. Some pieces were wholly functional and wearable however, and perhaps with the right styling this collection could prove a survivor.

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Words: Tom Rasmussen

PFW: GUY LAROCHE

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