Wonderland.

7 WONDERS: FLEABAG

*Looks off to the side* All the glorious highlights from season two.

The dinner party punch up

via GIPHY

Any doubt that the second season of Fleabag would match up to the first dissolved within the first five minutes of episode one. Set at yet another awkward family dinner, there were new developments in strained relationships, one devastatingly normal miscarriage in the toilets, an equally painful cover-up story and the introduction of one impossibly sexy priest. Inevitably, the drama descended into a public fist fight and if you didn’t feel smug watching Claire’s toxic husband get punched in the face, you’re lying.

Claire’s crisis haircut

via GIPHY

We all felt Claire’s devastating regret about this hair cut like it was our own. “I look like a pencil”, she sobbed, and we couldn’t help but think that was bang on. It’s an unbelievably shit haircut. Which meant it felt all the more heartwarming when other Klare – dreamboat Finnish businessman Klare – absolutely fucking adored it. Love is blind, people.

Andrew Scott as a sexy priest

via GIPHY

Who here didn’t let out an involuntary scream when Andrew Scott said, simply, “kneel”? It shouldn’t be hot, yet here we are, sweaty and weirdly overwhelmed. But besides him being the sexiest priest of. All. TIME, it’s their hopelessly doomed love story that had us really weeping. He’s the only character to catch her engaging with the audience, which feels like one big metaphor for really seeing her and we’ll probably never get over that ever.

Phoebe’s flash glances

via GIPHY

What would Fleabag be without Phoebe’s signature breaking-the-fourth-wall knowing glances to the camera? A raised eyebrow saying “I’m in there”. Pursed lips: “I’m absolutely fuming”. Both eyebrows: “Can you believe this?” They punctuate and magnify all the show’s best moments, making us feel like less of a fly on the wall and more like an all-knowing ally. The result? Die-hard emotional investment, obviously.

Olivia Coleman being ridiculously pass agg

via GIPHY

Never in the whole history of TV has there been a character capable of such an effortless stream of passive-aggressive put-downs. Played masterfully by Olivia Coleman, Fleabag’s step-mum proves insufferable pretty much the whole time in season two. Impossible not to despise, but also, obsessed.

Martini life advice from Kristin Scott Thomas

via GIPHY

Mid-way through the season, Kristin Scott Thomas arrived like a majestic fairy godmother – straight-talking, unapologetically successful, hilariously dry and a welcome antidote to Fleabag’s step-mother. We all died a little inside watching her genuinely connect with someone, especially when Kristin launched into a Martini-fuelled speech about how “women are born with pain built in”, to which every single one of us watching shouted “Yas!!!!” internally and probably cried a bit (again).

“I love you, but I’m not sure I like you all the time”

via GIPHY

Nobody was expecting to feel this way about Fleabag’s painfully uptight Dad. We weren’t ready for it, which made it all the more poignant when, whilst hiding in the attic at his own wedding, he finally got quite emosh. “I love you, but I’m not sure I like you all the time…”, he said, referencing the life and death of Fleabag’s mum, who’s absence is still felt subtly throughout: “You’re not the way you are because of me, you’re the way you are because of her and it’s those bits that you need to cling to.”

Also: There’s always time to check out a hot stranger

via GIPHY

Phoebe might have just broken the very expensive trophy to be awarded at her sister’s very important work event, but if there’s any overarching message to Fleabag, it’s that there’s always time to find humour in unthinkably bad circumstances. So here she is checking out a hot stranger whilst rushing around to fix the situation, because it’s just quite her.

More, because we’re not ready to let go either

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

Words
Rosie Byers
7 WONDERS: FLEABAG

Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related →