Wonderland.

New Noise: Vérité

Chatting with the alt-pop newcomer.

Brooklyn indie-pop star, Vérité, is set to become the newest big name in alt-pop. Having already achieved wild success with her debut single, “Strange Enough”, going viral on Twitter and her cover of The 1975’s “Somebody Else” approaching 10 million streams, the blonde bombshell is destined for great things.

Having just announced her debut album, Somewhere In Between, and her upcoming headline show on 6th April at London’s Electrwerkz, we caught up with the alt-pop megababe to find out all about her.

How did you get into music?

I’ve always played music in some way from classical piano, to fronting a punk cover band, to starting an overly ambitious alt rock band at sixteen while studying jazz. All of those things have gradually led to me starting my own project and building to where I am now.

Who did you listen to growing up?

I’m totally a child of 90’s alternative radio. I grew up on The Breeders, The Cranberries, Nirvana, Green Day, Hole, 4 Non Blondes, The Indigo Girls, Led Zeppelin, and eventually ventured into Radiohead, Death Cab for Cutie. At the Drive-in, the Mars Volta and Nelly Furtado.

Would you say that they played a developmental role in where you are now with your music?

Time. I’m definitely a person who learns by trial and error. I’ve experimented and figured things out for myself, failed a lot, but always moved forward with more knowledge and a better sense of myself. There are things I would’ve done differently and sometimes I wish I could skip fifteen steps, but Time and I have come to an agreement and I’ve committed myself to being okay with where I’ve landed.

Your stage name is inspired by cinéma vérité – are you into films?

I’m not much of a film person. I obviously love movies and watching films, but mostly as a mental escape or a way to put myself in someone else’s world. Cinema vérité came into play as I was searching for a name for the project. The definition – a film style set to represent a candid reality – really fit in with what I wanted to do with my project, so I committed to the name.

You collaboratively write your music. What is the creative process involved in this like?

It’s different with each collaboration. For the most part, I write the songs and strategically share them with producers who I then work really closely with to create a defined world for them to exist in. If the initial melody and lyrics don’t come from me, I have a hard time connecting to a song. I love working with people who surprise me and bring a strong perspective. Sometimes, I need some new energy and ideas brought to something I’m much too close to and leave the producer with the piano and vocal stems. Other times, we go into the studio and hash out intial production and continue back and forth with edits until finished. On this album, I worked closely with producers Zach Nicita, James Flannigan and Peter Thomas, all who have different aesthetics that I aimed to meld together across to create a unique sound.

“By maintaining ownership of my masters, complete autonomy and creative control of my project, I’m really able to release music whenever and however I want. Despite challenges, I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

How did it feel when your first ever single “Strange Enough” became the #1 Most Viral Twitter Artist?

I was completely surprised and stunned. I operate with extremely low expectations and really did not expect such an overwhelming reaction to the track. I was grateful there was an audience for that song.

Can you tell us about your new single “Phase Me Out”?

“Phase Me Out” is about being able to anticipate what’s going to happen and how meaningless the repetition of every day life can be. It’s this line I’ve drawn between myself and the world, represented in feeling like there’s no difference between being here or “phased out” and replaced. I wrote the song in a session in London a few years ago. The song gathered dust for a year or so as I was writing the album and eventually took on this siren-esque sound. I think it’s a perfect introduction to what’s to come.

What is your experience of being up-and-coming in the music industry?

I definitely have a unique experience in the music industry. I’m decidedly independent and have chosen to navigate those waters, as difficult and frustrating as they can be because I want to set myself up for a life long career. By maintaining ownership of my masters, complete autonomy and creative control of my project, I’m really able to release music whenever and however I want. Despite challenges, I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Last year you did your first UK tour. How was that?

It was amazing. The shows were small and it was definitely an introduction, but I can’t wait to continue playing shows and meeting more people over here.

Do you find there is a difference between American and British audiences?

I think the differences are more so in cities than America vs. England. Every city you play has a different vibe. I’d liken London to New York or Los Angeles, while Brighton and Nottingham were similar to Chicago or Boston, a more rowdy, loose crowd. Every show is a new feeling.

What does the rest of 2017 hold for you?

Everything in 2017 is about the debut LP and touring. I’m looking forward to keep my head down and releasing a lot of music.

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New Noise: Vérité

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