Wonderland.

New Threads: On/Off London Tomorrow's Talent

On the eve of London Fashion Week we stopped by to check out this year’s batch of graduate designers at On/Off, selected by Lee Lapthorne.

Mao Tseng Chang (RCA London)

Mao Tseng Chang’s collection was a maximalist affair of knitwear, fun fur, dramatic headdresses and killer perspex heeled boots. Combining elements of culture from around the world this collection was high-energy and vibrant.

Mao Tseng Chang (RCA London) Mao Tseng Chang’s collection was a maximalist affair of knitwear, fun fur, dramatic headdresses and killer perspex heeled boots. Combining elements of culture from around the world this collection was high-energy and vibrant.

Laetitia Berthier (RCA London)

Menswear designer Laetitia Berthier mixed technical fabrics with crushed velvet to subvert standard menswear tropes and establish a collection open to interpretation by the wearer. Some strong outerwear made this a highly wearable collection.

Laetitia Berthier (RCA London) Menswear designer Laetitia Berthier mixed technical fabrics with crushed velvet to subvert standard menswear tropes and establish a collection open to interpretation by the wearer. Some strong outerwear made this a highly wearable collection.

Yeojin Kim (RCA London)

Playing with silhouette and contorting the female body shape, Yeojin Kim used what appeared to be stretch jersey pulled tight over wires. The collection was structural and vaguely space-age and the models danced and twisted down the runway to maximise the dynamic effect of the clothes.

Yeojin Kim (RCA London) Playing with silhouette and contorting the female body shape, Yeojin Kim used what appeared to be stretch jersey pulled tight over wires. The collection was structural and vaguely space-age and the models danced and twisted down the runway to maximise the dynamic effect of the clothes.

Stefan Kartchev (RCA Antwerp)

Stefan Kartchev’s highly digital collection was inspired by science fiction and sportswear, and used lycra in a palette of salmon pink and white to cover moulded body parts. The illusion was like a surreal light trail, as if the body was moving at high speed in opposing directions. According to Kartchev, the 1988 Rybczynski film “The Fourth Dimension” was a big inspiration because of its experimentation with time warp and body distortion.

Stefan Kartchev (RCA Antwerp) Stefan Kartchev’s highly digital collection was inspired by science fiction and sportswear, and used lycra in a palette of salmon pink and white to cover moulded body parts. The illusion was like a surreal light trail, as if the body was moving at high speed in opposing directions. According to Kartchev, the 1988 Rybczynski film “The Fourth Dimension” was a big inspiration because of its experimentation with time warp and body distortion.
Words
India Birgitta Jarvis
New Threads: On/Off London Tomorrow's Talent

Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related → Related →