Wonderland.

LCM: E. TAUTZ AW16

Patrick Grant lent his tailored magic to updating dubious 80s casual-wear – and won.

80s Redux

Patrick Grant, everyone’s favourite bearded televised-sewing-competition judge (and, of course, designer) brought his usual flair for re-imagining and modernising the past to E. Tautz this weekend. This time, it was a potentially surprising source of inspiration for a brand renowned for traditional fabrics and elegantly vintage cuts: 80s Edinburgh and its nylon tracksuits. Fans of E. Tautz’s well-curated beauty need not worry though – you won’t find any scratchy polyester here. Instead, the keynote cuts of the era found themselves smartly updated. Think slouched double-breasted jackets and a certain fullness of cut and fabric that Armani’s 80s held so dear.

Drape Cut

Trousers, in particular, came generously cut, high waisted and single-pleated (a Patrick Grant special in recent years) and were worn with everything from woolen t-s with a touch of sheen,to Nehru-collared, one button shirts in dark navy. The most impressive re-imagining of the 80s came in the form of the more casual pieces, which took some of that decade’s regrettable (and frequently beige) blouson-style jackets and farbricated them in dark, tasteful flannels or clean contemporary textiles. The besom pockets remained, as did the choice to pair them with narrow collared shirts and a tie, but these were something altogether more covetable than a charity shop golfing jacket.

Never Gonna Give You Up

The same went for the double-breasted raincoat (a Rick Astley classic) that was presented this time in deep cream wool with its infamously busy bells and whistles almost ironically exaggerated (eppaulettes drooped well past the shoulder). Thick knits and fuzzy cardigans also benefited from Grant’s discerning eye – who else could make a bobble sweater look this elegant and timeless? E. Tautz’s take on nostalgia may not be terribly authentic, but it sure does look good.

LCM: E. TAUTZ AW16

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