Wonderland.

PLAYLIST: STONY BROWDER JR – ‘LOUD AND ANGRY: THE FOREFATHERS OF REBELLION’.

7+ piece collective Stony Browder Jr are making us forget it’s only mid-week with their eclectic, diverse and colourful Wonderland playlist.

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Stony Browder Jr are a live music collective putting a modern, tropical twist on funky mutant disco, a genre started by members of the band’s father – the one and only Kid Creole.

The 7+ piece band take inspiration from the old and conjure up a cocktail of new funk and groove paying respect to those who stepped before them and further challenging audiences to define their genre. Think heritage of Kid Creole and The Coconuts meets The Streets with the creative funk of Prince. ‘Let The Jungle Grow’ embodies all of this and more.
Take a listen to their  7-track playlist, curated exclusively for Wonderland.

Loud and angry: The Forefathers of Rebellion. 

1) ‘Black and I’m Proud’ (1968) – James Brown.

“This song, arguably, single handedly changed the meaning of the word black. Before this song, being black meant being a negro. James Brown popularised a term in 1968 that is still used today to define billions of people”.

2) ‘There But For the Grace of God, Go I’ (1979) – Machine.

“A dark cultural comedy, set in New York City about mixing class, race, gender and sexuality”.

3) ‘Negro By Injection’ (1982) – Lord Kitchener.

“Lord Kitchener, the king of calypso, lightheartedly reminds us of the cultural pressures once applied to stay purely white”.

4) ‘No Fish Today’ (1983) – Kid Creole and the Coconuts.

“A fervent comment on the corruption of hierarchy and dictatorships in developing countries”.

5) ‘Army Arrangement’ (1985) – Fela Kuti.

“Fela had a mission statement to empower Nigeria’s people. He wrote Army Arrangement to expose the patterns shown by the Government’s militias, who were handing back power to the parties that they had just overthrown”.

6) ‘Nothing But Flowers’ (1988) – Talking Heads.

“David Byrne wonderfully takes the gentrification discussion and turns it on it’s head”.

7) ‘The Hunter’ (2015) – Slaves.

“A very relevant, immediate and self-aware discussion on modern socio-political issues”.

Check out the video for ‘Let The Jungle Grow’ here:

Words: Shane Hawkins

PLAYLIST: STONY BROWDER JR – ‘LOUD AND ANGRY: THE FOREFATHERS OF REBELLION’.

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