Wonderland.

NEW NOISE: S.O

The rapper is looking to his Nigerian roots and the legacy left behind his father for his new summer-ready EP, “Larry Ginni Crescent”.

S.O.
S.O.

What better place to seek inspiration for a musical project than your roots? Well, this is exactly what rap artist S.O is doing with his newest EP, “Larry Ginni Crescent”. A rhythmic project that is packed full of lyrical flows and production that is masterfully crafted by Grammy Award-nominated producer, GP, listeners of the EP can expect to get lost in warm, summer-ready sounds. And, with the artist looking to his upbringing in Nigeria as the inspiration for the track’s lyrics, the project becomes profound in nature.

When speaking on the inspiration behind his latest project, the artist confessed, “I loved growing up in Nigeria, but I often feel that I should have stayed there a little longer, but when you are younger you don’t have much of a say (even though I am told they asked me what I want to do and I said move to London)! I always knew that my first Afrobeats project would be named after the road I grew up on in Nigeria. That sense of community I felt, those sweet memories I have – all of which I get to share with the world. ‘Larry Ginni Crescent’ is a gateway for me to share an aspect of myself I have not shared in my music too much.”

Upon the release of his EP, the artist sat down with Wonderland to discuss looking to his roots for musical inspiration and his father’s influence over his musical direction. Head below to read the interview now…

Hi S.O., how are you doing? How has your 2021 been?
Thanks for interviewing me. I am doing well. I have been travelling a lot recently so I have been both busy and tired. 2021 has been good so far. I think the pandemic opened me up to a lot more opportunities that I have been working on. I am excited to see what the rest of the year brings.

Talk us through your beginnings in music! When did you discover your love for it?
I was around 6-years-old when I picked up a microphone. My grandma was turning 60 and I rapped a freestyle for her on her birthday. From that moment, I knew that music was something I could do. Fast forward to age 15, and my dad takes me to my first studio session (while I was visiting him in Nigeria) and, the desire to create music was solidified. However, it was not until I turned 21 that I knew I wanted to do it as a career. I had just graduated from Durham University, released my first mixtape online – fans crashed the website – and I knew I had something to offer the world.

You are based in Texas right now! Do you think this has influenced your sound?
I am indeed! I wouldn’t say it has, you know. It is actually weird because the UK is currently the most influential when it comes to my sound right now. Even though I don’t live there anymore, I’m heavily plugged into what is going on, what is being created. Of course, the people I am around in Texas are influential to what I create. I tend to make music from real-life – having conversations, doing life with people, has majorly made me create the way I am creating also.

Who would you cite as your biggest musical influences?
Definitely my dad. Before he passed away, he was my biggest supporter, made my first album artwork, took me to my first studio session. My dad showed me how the advertising world worked, he showed me the importance of relationships and giving it your all. Music can be both a talent and a developed skill. I believe it is both for me, but my dad helped cultivate it.

Congratulations on the release of your new EP, “Larry Gini Crescent”! How does it feel to release this body of work?
It feels awesome! A breath of fresh air and something I have been trying to do for the last 2 years. To finally get the time to start and finish has been good. I’m super proud of the songs I made. I’m proud of the collaboration my team and I put forward to create this project. All there is now is for the world to hear what we have been creating.

S.O. sitting
S.O. sitting

You have looked to your African roots for the inspiration on this particular project and this included reminiscing over your childhood spent in Nigeria. What was this process like for you?
It was both a happy and sad one. I loved growing up in Nigeria, but I often feel that I should have stayed there a little longer, but when you are younger you don’t have much of a say (even though I am told they asked me what I want to do and I said move to London)! I always knew that my first Afrobeats project would be named after the road I grew up on in Nigeria. That sense of community I felt, those sweet memories I have – all of which I get to share with the world. “Larry Ginni Crescent” is a gateway for me to share an aspect of myself I have not shared in my music too much.

Which is your favourite track from the EP?
I would say it is a toss-up between “Prosper” and “Good To Me”. The former is the survivors’ anthem! And we have survived a lot over the last year and some change. “Good To Me” reminds me that regardless of what is happening in my life, God has His hands on me and is good to me.

You also collaborated with producer TBabz for this project! Talk us through your relationship with him and how you came to join forces with him.
Shout out to my cousin Faith Child, who introduced me to TBabz and his production. Most of my projects have the majority of production from GP, but with this project, I wanted to open the door a little bit more and connect with different up and coming producers. TBabz sent me a pack of beats and “Kinda Love” was in there. As soon as I heard it I knew I needed to lay it and the rest is history. He then went on to produce Corner & Wonder.

What is next for you? Do you have any other projects in the works?
I am shooting more visuals for this project while finishing up my next album. One thing about me is I am always creating. I have hundreds of songs – some sketches, others complete bodies of work. Those will come as the year concludes, but for now, it’s all about “Larry Ginni Crescent”.

NEW NOISE: S.O

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