Wonderland.

7 WONDERS: LATIN AMERICAN CLUB MUSIC

A quick dive into the region’s blossoming scene.

Club music in Latin America, for the past decade, has served as a vessel for the exploration of identity and heritage. It comes as no surprise that Boiler Room would choose to host their current BUDx event in Santiago: a city that is home to new collectives and labels, such as Diamante Records, whose sounds and optics are galvanising the music scene in the region.

Boiler Room and Budweiser’s event promises to remove the gap between people and the music they love from around the world. The programme in Santiago will celebrate the Latin American music scene and provide in-depth discussions with musicians such as the iconic, Ms Honey Dijon. Honey’s rise to recognition in the electronic music industry was meteoric and she continues to stun audiences today. An intimate lecture with the woman herself will explore Honey’s journey as an artist; trace back to the start of her career in Chicago and New York as an aspiring musician; and go through the records that are most integral to her career. (The lecture will be available to live stream on the Wonderland Facebook page tonight at 23:30(BST): you don’t want to miss it.)

BUDx Boiler Room will also host forthcoming panelists such as Valesuchi (Chile), David Bugueño Zuñiga (Chile), Lechuga Zafiro (Uruguay), and Daniel Klauser (Chile). The event will prove to celebrate the Latin American music scene: one that definitely should be honoured. Ahead of the panel talk, we delve into the region’s scene with seven musical outputs from Latin America you should get to know.

Daniel Klauser, Diamante label head and producer

Let’s start with one of BUDx Boiler Room’s own. At the helm of Diamante, Danile Klausner has helped to bring global artists to perform at underground parties in Santiago as well as supporting the area’s own. Taking notes from house, in his own tracks, Klauser denies conventions of the genre and takes things murkier while keeping it melodic.

Fantasna, DJ

Invited by Boiler Room to attend the first session held in Santiago, Fantasna has a reputable legacy within international electronic music. ALMA sounds describes his sound as being characterised by sophistication and attention to detail. He emerged and continues to grow as one of the most interesting artists in South America’s music scene.

Deltatron, Terror Negro label head and producer

A Red Bull Music Academy Tokyo alum, Peruvian DJ Deltatron heads up Terror Negro Records, the Lima label that’s been firing out releases since 2010. In his own music, he ventures into reggaeton and hip hop and as a DJ, he’s recently come to UK to share waves and play weird cuts with NAAFI at our beloved NTS.

NAAFI, DJ crew and label

NAAFI has fast become notorious for hosting the wildest parties in Mexico City and unleashing them into the wider world. Regular Boiler Room fixtures, you can credit them for bringing what just might have been the first ever NYC-style vogue ball to Mexico, absorbing and evolving global styles in new ways for fresh crowds.

Nicola Cruz, DJ

Nicola Cruz channels the landscapes and environment of his home country, Ecuador. The country’s natural landscapes inspire Cruz’s music; listening to his tracks he reflects the environment of his homeland and ultimately produces mesmerising sounds.

Alpha S, DJ

Santiago’s Alpha S has most recently been churning out more recognisable tracks as warped bootlegs: think Skepta, ASAP Ferg and Princess Nokia reworks. As for his original songs, he’s released frenetic, bass-heavy club tracks on Chile’s Discos Pegaos.

Valesuchi, DJ

Chilean producer, Valesuchi, creates her music by tapping into “saudade”: a Portuguese adjective that describes the feeling of love after someone has gone. Her music is dark and evocative earning her popularity amongst club audiences. She is no stranger to performing at major festivals such as Primavera and Sonar as well as being an active member of the underground electronic music scene in Santiago, Chile.

7 WONDERS: LATIN AMERICAN CLUB MUSIC

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