Wonderland.

LCM: MOSCHINO AW16

Moschino continues to sit at the outrageous end of the spectrum for another season.

Gilbert and George

The two British artists Gilbert and George, and their extensive archive, were the main touchpoint for Jeremy Scott’s AW16 collection over at Moschino on Sunday night. The Italian brand is wholly predicated on humour, and it’s always refreshing to see a shit load of colour all over the catwalk. And colour was what we got this season — much like G&G’s work — there was suiting, jeans, jackets and shirts all in shades of hi-octane pink, yellow, blue, green with sprayed and coloured squiggles of black and white all over them — painted on creases. This is the suit for the one who wants to stop traffic, and indeed they will. The only disappointing thing is that Gilbert and George like David Cameron (what a blow), but then again Jeremy Scott isn’t necessarily known for his on point fashion politics — so perhaps a well suited match.

I wish I was a Punk Rocker

Tight, low slung skinnies in acid yellows and heavy blacks had matching half-kilts swinging from the bum, and criss-cross straps wound around the legs — reminiscent of early Westwood, or Madonna during the re-invention years. Doc Martens and Wellies (still not sure about these…) were spray painted, and detailed with black and white scrawls — much like the suits. This was by far the most baddass offering we’ve seen from Scott at Moschino, while he continues to mix the hyper-kitsch with precision design, his model army became street warriors in the latter half of the show: sleeves and trousers read words ‘hope’ or ‘fear’ or ‘power’ in white block capitals. And it’s no doubt that Jeremy Scott, indeed, has a lot of power — responsible for one of the biggest brand comebacks ever, Moschino continues to sit at the outrageous end of the spectrum which is a welcome change in a world full of moody monotones and stuffy old suiting.

Photographer
Thurstan Redding
Words
Tom Rasmussen
LCM: MOSCHINO AW16

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