Wonderland.

LCM: Christopher Shannon AW16

For the small town breakouts and those brave enough to wear PVC, Christopher Shannon, at your service.

An Intelligent Downgrade?

A usual suspect on the show scene, Shannon opted for a presentation at the Alison Jacques Gallery this AW16. A notably much smaller collection, with a meagre six looks, one might feel a little suspicious at this very visible production downgrade. But perhaps Shannon’s new format is significant of a changing fashion landscape: more collections with less time has seen the departure of many big hitters from even bigger houses in the short time between last season and this one. Instead of designing endless show-pieces that will go into archive, and never be taken by any buyer, focusing all energies into a smaller collection of pieces that are more thought through may potentially make more sense both financially and time-wise.

Babysitters and their boys

‘The comfort and the horror’ was the title of Shannon’s menswear offering — relating to his feelings about the suburbs. He speaks about the time pre-high-street clothing actually being wearable, when you’d buy a coat from somewhere else and it would cause a ruckus on the street, among friends, in those little English towns where very little happens (trust). The aesthetic was predicated upon the boyfriends of his babysitters — the cool boys you’d look up to. With shell bomber jackets and zip ups that spelled out ‘Shannon’ on their collars, it was kind of late 80s/early 90s tragi-fashion. There’s a play on the ironic, but Shannon has such a knack for making even the lamest trend look damn cool.

Welcome to my home

Gingham and striped patchwork super-short boxers, an oversized borg fleece coat, and structured PVC Macs — in clear, smoky charcoal, and Flamingo Pink — were highlights from the collection. Accessories were little deconstructed English coins in gold, which dangled from a single ear — very Liverpool lad, with a twist of camp. His recent collaboration with the legendary Liverpudlian feminist artist Linder Sterling, whose work has looked at domesticity and women for years, has apparently inspired the young designer for this season — with the set based on the shell of a suburban Barratt home.

Photographer: Thurstan Redding

Words: Tom Rasmussen

LCM: Christopher Shannon AW16

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