Wonderland.

DIOR: NEW LOOKS

Dior in every way possible; Jérôme Gautier compiles and commends the photographic immortalisation of the Maison since 1947.

Woman modelling black velvet visor with rhinestone pin and satin scarf, both by Dior. — Image by © Condé Nast Archive/Corbis

Woman modelling black velvet visor with rhinestone pin and satin scarf, both by Dior. — Image by © Condé Nast Archive/Corbis

1947 saw the inception of Christian Dior’s New Look. In the same year, Irving Penn and Richard Avedon captured both the man himself and the collection in a style that was as revolutionary as the clothing. From that moment, to the succession of Yves Saint Laurent, to Raf Simons and everything in between, journalist Jérôme Gautier examines the progression of Dior’s groundbreaking collection.

Interpreted through some of fashion’s finest photographers throughout their careers, Dior: New Look documents how the label has long dominated the industry. Inspecting the photographers’ work as much as the influential garments, with names like Willy Vanderperre, Mario Testino and David Sims making up the pages. A comprehensive and beautiful history of the brand, whether you’re a die-hard Dior fan or not, the volume is an insight to almost 70 years of photography in fashion.

Peter Lindbergh, 2012; Christian Dior Haute Couture par Raf Simons, automne-hiver 2012 

Peter Lindbergh, 2012; Christian Dior Haute Couture par Raf Simons, automne-hiver 2012 

Nathaniel Goldberg, 1999. Christian Dior Haute Couture par John Galliano, automne-hiver 1999

Nathaniel Goldberg, 1999. Christian Dior Haute Couture par John Galliano, automne-hiver 1999

Norman Parkinson, 1975. Christian Dior Haute Couture by Marc Bohan, autumn–winter 1975

Norman Parkinson, 1975. Christian Dior Haute Couture by Marc Bohan, autumn–winter 1975

Dior: New Looks is published by Thames & Hudson and is out now.

DIOR: NEW LOOKS

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