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PLAYLIST: TALA

Wonderland sat down with TALA, the London based musician of Iranian descent bursting on to the electronic pop scene. 

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TALA is a girl with gumption and a huge passion for music. She’s expressive and full of opinions and ideas. Her music is a brilliant mix of electronic and pop, with just a little bit of Iranian influence from a childhood with her Dad thrown in there for good measure. Even from a young age TALA has been clear cut about her musical influences and how much she cared about the art. She started playing piano at seven “which was probably my first intro to music”. This quickly developed into the musician experimenting with Reason, the music programme, and “making up beats and stuff”. The rest, as they say, is history.

Travel has been a huge influence for TALA writing her most recent album, the concept of which is her collaborating with artists she’s picked specially. It’s clear that meeting new people, learning about cultures and soaking in worlds that are foreign to her have all contributed hugely to the music she makes. The purpose of this travel for Tala is her belief that “when you take yourself out of your comfort zone and change your environment it can be really good for your creative space” especially when you’re “influenced by new surroundings”.

It isn’t just the new places that have influenced the way she writes, but most importantly the people she’s met along the way. Making a “collaborative project” and expressing herself with friends and loved ones that she admires. “All the artists I have worked with are people I’ve discovered and heard about. It took it out of me just thinking I was putting out another EP. I didn’t want that. Switch it up. Keep it exciting, keep it interesting.”

TALA’s passion for music is infectious, and here at Wonderland we want even the tiniest slice of what she seems to be devouring on a daily basis. So, in order to do just that, we asked her to come up with a playlist, all for us, and talk us through some of the new and exciting music she’s pushing right now.

Sadat & Alaa 50

“I was lucky to work with Sadat & Alaa 50 at their record label/studio 100 Copies whilst I was in Cairo, travelling for my Malika project. They are pioneers of the electro chabbi sound and both have such rawness in their lyrics, energy and flow. I am obsessed with the Chabbi movement. It’s so interesting to see this new generation and breed of artist that are part of a growing underground scene in Egypt.”

Vince Staples 

“I loved Vince Staple’s summertime 06 ‘album. Señorita is literally one of my favourite videos from this year. I love the grittiness and the pace of it. It compliments the track so well. I think he’s super talented and someone I would love to work with in the future.”

Mssingno 

“The first track I heard of mssingno’s was Xe2 from his self titled EP. I loved how he flipped that R. Kelly sample in such a sick way. The tune was so hard but with those beautiful melodies the contrast is what makes his music so special. I just love how all the sounds he uses are polar opposites and compliment each other so well. He’s a super talented producer and I love how he is repping that hard bodied UK sound.”

Sylas

“Sylas and I both put our first EPs out on the wonderful label Aesop. They are both incredibly talented and have only showed the world a glimpse of what they have to offer. The first time I met the guys they came to visit me at my studio in London and straight away I knew that we were going to make some shit. I loved their energy and I felt we all work in quite a similar way. Our love for boys II men sealed the deal.”

DJ Dhai

“A lot of people know of Dahi as a producer who has been responsible for some serious tunes such as ‘Worst Behaviour’ (Drake) and ‘Money Trees’ (Kendrick Lamar).  I wanted to add him to this list as he is a very talented artist too and I loved his track “Drop” from his solo project that he recently put out. Dahi has his own sound. His subs patterns and the groove to all his tracks are so unique and original that you know it’s a Dahi beat. He is one of the key new wave hip hop producers making waves.”

J£ZUS MILLION

“You may have heard of Je$us million from a track that Charlie xcx vocaled back in 2013 (illusions of).I’ve been following him for a while now and he is a super talented young producer on that new wave. I love how he just doesn’t give a fuck and he’s just doing his thing.”

Sophie

“Lemonade and Bipp are two of my favourite SOPHIE tracks. I love how hard and gully they are but the vocals are so fun and not what you expect to hear. I also thought his recent singles collection release “Product” that came with a silicon product was really unique and something that only SOPHIE could pull off. I rate those bold moves.”

Face-Eaters of Hong Kong

“Face eaters of Hong Kong is super swagged out gangster glitched up music. Every time I hear this track it makes me think I’m princess peach literally driving down rainbow road in Mario Kart.”

Ash Koosha

“You may have heard about the Iranian -Cannes jury prize winning documentary film “No one knows about Persian Cats” which follows Ash’s bands story in the Iranian underground scene.Ash’s story and journey as an artist is so intriguing. His influences are so broad which makes his sound so individual. His recent album he put out “GUUD” caught my attention. The elements of electronic sounds and Persian rhythms work so well together.”

100s

“I first discovered 100s (kossisko konan) when a friend of mine told me his tunes were featured in the recent GTA. I love computer games and GTA is so sick for finding random songs you’ve never heard before. I love his image and videos, and his E.P Ivry is a must. It has that sick gangster g funk Cali vibes.”

Look out for more NEW NOISE from TALA, where she talks to artists she loves all about their creative processes.

Words: India Opie Meres

PLAYLIST: TALA

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