Wonderland.

#MYNAMEIS

Amin Arts have commissioned billboards spanning over the cardinal points of London on which five participating artists explore the definition of a name

#MYNAMEIS

#MYNAMEIS is a public exhibition put together by London based gallery Annïn Arts. They most recently put on an exhibition with Jeurgen Teller in which Teller’s photographs were displayed atop bus shelters along The Strand. Now, Annïn Arts have commissioned billboards spanning over the cardinal points of London.

Each of the five participating artists have something to say about what a name, be it theirs or someone else’s, means to them. Kevin Morsoky, Duval Timothy, Nastasia Alberti, Annie Mackin and Turner Prize winner Gillian Wearing, explore the burdens names may carry, the prejudices they might create, and the confusion they can cause.

Gillian Wearing’s piece is in London Bridge Station. Echoing the hub of transport in which her billboard is placed, she has photographed her namesake on the tube. The longer anonymous Gillian Wearing, sits opposite her. Gillian Wearing by Gillian Wearing begs the question: who is Gillian Wearing?

#MYNAMEIS

In the same Location is Duval Timothy’s location specific work, London Bridge Arizona Arizona London Bridge. His work is based on the fact that the stone that made the original London Bridge was shipped to Arizona, and rebuilt there. His bespoke suit made from the colours and patterns of the Arizona state flag was worn by Timothy as he walked across London Bridge (in London) during the morning commute in which thousands of people migrate across the river.

Expect to be challenged in Westbourne Grove by Morosky’s artwork that looks at the assumption that a person can base their expectations of a person’s race on their name. His work Lateefa Smith/ Chang Jian Wen seems particularly poignant in a city as multiracial as London.

Artist Annie Mackin’s piece at Camden Road Station explore the burden and mocking that she has dealt with because of having the same name as Radio One DJ Annie Mac (manus). The triptych depicts two decks and a mixer. There are the dark, murky strokes of an artist on one canvas, and the bright circular pop of a radio DJ on the other. Something of a hybrid is blossoming (or perhaps grappling for dominance) in the centre.

#MYNAMEIS

Nastasia Alberti is the fifth and final artist, who’s own name does not feature in this particular piece of art, but instead looks at feminist writer’s, Karley Sciortino. Her formal portrait of the Vogue journalist somewhat contradicts the reputation of her articles, which discuss candid observations, sexual matters, and fetishism.

The five artists in #MYNAMEIS have explored the idea of how prior knowledge of a person’s name can distort the image of them, and leaves this idea hanging over anyone who walks past them.

Words: Remy Millar

#MYNAMEIS

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